Elsewhere is a living museum, studio and school set within a former thrift store.
VISIT: 606 S Elm St Greensboro, NC 27406
OPEN: Wed - Sat 1-10pm (March - November)
WEB: goelsewhere.org
Install Theme

Our House Intern, Katie Shlon, has been making drawings of house and garden spaces with hopes to turn some of these images into wallpaper for Elsewhere’s common areas. Here’s what she had to say about the pieces:

"I made these drawings during some quiet weekends at Elsewhere. They’re fun to do and a great way to stay engaged in active looking.The drawings are little snippets of our surroundings, things that I look at everyday and think are interesting. We’re surrounded by tons of stuff at Elsewhere so it’s nice to just focus in on small parts of the environment. The drawings themselves take into account the energy of each object and reflect my own perception of the character."

Check out more of Katie’s amazing work at http://www.kshlon.com/
house question, cats or dogs? I’m biased.

house question, cats or dogs? I’m biased.

"Our Building Curator and Intern recently made this handy dandy pulley laundry rack. Before, our laundry line cut straight across our alley way— making the garden feel closed-off and cluttered. Now, this rope and 2x4 system makes it easy to get the clothes out of our community space and up into an underutilized over hang. It took a day to make and was constructed from simple materials that cost nearly nothing. You can see in the video the House intern loves it- thank you Building Department!

What are your laundry tips and tricks? “

Interview with Fionn Duffy | Artist in Residence

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Fionn Duffy is currently an artist in residence at Elsewhere. She was born in Glasgow, Scotland and currently lives and works between Brighton, London and Glasgow. She is an interdisciplinary artist whose practice involves the curation of exhibitions and events, often choosing to work collaboratively with other artists, musicians, dancers and composers. She is especially concerned with the point where the transient nature of performance and the materiality of sculpture meet, questioning the duality of “here and there,” “now and then,” “you and me” and exploring the possibilities of these elements existing simultaneously as a whole. With an interest in improvisation and participation, each piece of work initiates a dialogue between the artist, performer and viewer, at times allowing roles to fluctuate and overlap. Her current project at Elsewhere involves the creation of whistles and the playful interrogation of them as instruments and as way to interact with the surrounding environment.

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Elsewhere: So your whistles are basically a form of place based creative inquiry, allowing people to interact with the environment around them…can you tell me a little more about that?

Fionn: When I first got to Elsewhere I was really overwhelmed with the amount of stuff and how it built up over time. I have also never lived near a railroad before. The sounds of the trains coming past felt really present in this space…I kind of felt like the museum was its own type of transport. I started to see this museum, this building as transporting you to another place. Also the fact that nothing leaves or comes into this collection means its almost like a freight train traveling through time rather than space while meanwhile those trains, the sound of them, comes into the space.

So I started by trying to find out their schedules because I was really interested in how they interrupted life here. It is so loud you have to stop talking, you kind of wait for the noise to pass. I started recording the sounds of the trains going past and I found that they were really beautiful. I found them like musical cords and so I started listening back to the recordings I made and making them into chords so I’ve got a score of the chords.  And then from that I was interested again in the individual people and things in this space and how I could kind of see them as individuals but also as a group and so I started off wanting to record everyone singing individually and have those playing throughout the museum.

I was really excited by all the pieces of wood in the wood library because they are collection as well, they’re seen as special objects, but in any other workshop they would be seen as junk and so I liked the idea again of the museum singing and of lots of different people being able to interact with them. So I got to the point where I was making whistles and yea, now I’m just kind of experimenting with how people enjoy playing them, playing them together and they work on lots of different levels…they play chromatic scales so you can make up something but you could also just enjoy the different shapes and different sounds they make.

Elsewhere: So where do you think you’re going to go next with this project? How do you hope to continue?

Fionn: Well I’m very influenced by music, classical music. I was classically trained when I was young and decided to pursue art after that so I would really like to make a score, a piece of music that is maybe in 3 movements so its like a sonata or that kind of thing. So I want to have a document that looks like a normal musical score and have maybe the first movement being a response to the trains every time you hear them and the second movement being replaying that first weeks cords on the same days and that’s kind of an interesting kind of synchronicity between the sounds in real life and the sounds I heard back then and then replaying them and listening to the trains at the same time. I was really interested in the fact that Elizabeth Cotton’s song Freight Train, is from North Carolina.

Also I want to explore the actual music making part of these whistles because they are instruments even though they are art objects or whatever you want to call them. So I’m planning on getting a group of people together to stage a performance of that using the whistles and singing. So that would be the third movement and I feel like that’s a good way to round everything up and bring it together but still leave it open and stilling having the whistles here for people to play with them if they want.

Fionn Duffy will wrap up her project in the next two weeks but the whistles will remain at Elsewhere. The public is always invited to come play with them.

http://www.fionnduffy.co.uk/

house question! sharin’ skillz

house question! sharin’ skillz

Looking for a way to store and label dry goods that’s both creative and efficient? Our House(pitality) Curator and Intern Katie have come up with a system that we’re super excited to share. Try making small banners (wood works well because it won’t get dirty or water-warped like a paper label) with elastic loops. On the front, label each jar’s contents. On the back, write simple instructions for preparation. That way, you’re not constantly running to Google and putting your oil-covered-dinner-prep fingers all over that MacBook. The elastic slips right over the rim of a mason jar, and VOILA — you have a rustic, eco-friendly, reusable storage option.

Do you have a system for storing and labeling dry goods? Send us a photo!


House Question: how do we keep ourselves (and Elsewhere!) cool in this nutso North Carolina heat?

House Question: how do we keep ourselves (and Elsewhere!) cool in this nutso North Carolina heat?

            Ever wondered what life is like Elsewhere? We’re planning to give some behind-the-scene peeks into our living museum’s land of house(pitality) — the kitchen and garden.  Our house(pitality) curator, Emily Ensminger (pictured above), uses her skills as an artist to find creative solutions to  develop and care for these common spaces … which we’ll be sharing with YOU!

            Our Kitchen Commons is one of Elsewhere’s most complex living installations. The space was designed collaboratively in 2011 by artist Morgan J. Puett and Building Curator Ian Montgomery; the two of them imagined a space that was functional, aesthetically pleasing, and resourceful. While Elsewhereians cook and converse in this space, museum guests are invited to wander through or even join us for meals. Our food co-op purchases from sustainable local sources, such as the Greensboro farmer’s market. Elsewhereians come together for a community meal every Wednesday-Saturday at 7:00 p.m., and we’d love for you to join us! Dinner costs $5 a night for members, and $10 a night for non-members. You can expect to be dished up a high-quality vegetarian plate prepared by our very own artists, curators and interns.

WHAT FOOD WOULD YOU FLY ON!

WHAT FOOD WOULD YOU FLY ON!

Are you having a meeting? It’s the House Question!  What’s your favorite Elsewhere memory?

Are you having a meeting? It’s the House Question! What’s your favorite Elsewhere memory?

RE: OPEN ENGAGEMENT

Reflections from Open Engagement, a national conference on Art and Social Practice.
George Scheer, Elsewhere Co-Founder + Director, June 2014
Last month a team of Elsewherians ventured to NY for Open Engagement, a three day conference on Art and Social Practice held at the Queens Museum.  It was an excellent gathering of artists from around the country doing spectacular work in the public sphere. Not only were there lectures, panels, and talks, but the conference hosted visits to fellow arts organizations, alongside opportunities for bowling and karaoke.  Our own Emily Ensminger, House(pitality) Curator, gave a wonderful presentation about hospitality as both an artistic practice and a performative feature in Elsewhere’s museum. 
A discussion about the role of artists in institutions and artist-made institutions was a significant topic of conversation in and out of conference sessions.  Throughout the weekend, artists presented their cross-over work in social justice, city planning, museum education, and endeavors to create their own institutions.  The conference showcased a broad spectrum of these practices while offering serious critique about the value of artist labor, the difficulty to monetize social capital, and need for a fair wage economy for arts workers. 
For my part, I continue to think about Elsewhere at the forefront of a movement that is creating a new kind institutional imaginary.  More than an artist space, residency, or museum, we, alongside others in the field, are pioneering the way institutions can be more responsive, participatory, and supportive of artists and publics. In this new frontier, we must re-imagine the role of an arts organization as integral to daily life. What would it look like if arts organizations were no longer a place for simply presenting artists and artworks? How could arts organizations model more integrated practices between creatives and administrations, greater connection to activism and community leadership, less hierarchical strategies for fundraising and decision making? What if arts organizations could operate more directly as producers of social action? What would an organization look like whose mission it was to place artists in all sectors of our community and in all parts of civic and public life? 
These questions are guiding what appears to be an emerging field or new wave of artist run organizations. I can only hope that the organizational practices we build today will have a far reaching effect on the way we deliver service and approach social challenges across cultural sectors. I suspect that in 20 years we will have a whole new definition for the term ‘artist’ and a different understanding of the role artists play in public life.

Farm to Table Fundraiser | May 30th, 7pm

Join us for a special Farm to Table Dinner to support QueerLab, an education program for LGBTQ youth in North Carolina. Enjoy a medley of fresh foods donated by local farms in the Triad, and a presentation from youth involved with the program. All funds support the publication of I Don’t Do Boxes, a youth-led magazine exploring LGBTQ southern experience.

Tickets include a three course meal, special cocktails and wine/beer. Doors open at 6:30pm, with dinner served at 7pm, and a tour of Elsewhere museum to follow (606 S. Elm Street, Greensboro, NC). The dinner is co-organized by Megan Denton, a chef, farmer, and founder of Able Farms in Portland, OR.

goelsewhere.org/farmtotable

house question, what would your pop-up shop be?

house question, what would your pop-up shop be?

Farm to Table Fundraiser | May 30th, 7pm

Join us for a special Farm to Table Dinner to support QueerLab, an education program for LGBTQ youth in North Carolina. Enjoy a medley of fresh foods donated by local farms in the Triad, and a presentation from youth involved with the program. All funds support the publication of I Don’t Do Boxes, a youth-led magazine exploring LGBTQ southern experience.

Tickets include a three course meal, special cocktails and wine/beer. Doors open at 6:30pm, with dinner served at 7pm, and a tour of Elsewhere museum to follow (606 S. Elm Street, Greensboro, NC). The dinner is co-organized by Megan Denton, a chef, farmer, and founder of Able Farms in Portland, OR.

goelsewhere.org/farmtotable

Farm to Table Fundraiser | May 30th, 7pm

Join us for a special Farm to Table Dinner to support QueerLab, an education program for LGBTQ youth in North Carolina. Enjoy a medley of fresh foods donated by local farms in the Triad, and a presentation from youth involved with the program. All funds support the publication of I Don’t Do Boxes, a youth-led magazine exploring LGBTQ southern experience.

Tickets include a three course meal, special cocktails and wine/beer. Doors open at 6:30pm, with dinner served at 7pm, and a tour of Elsewhere museum to follow (606 S. Elm Street, Greensboro, NC). The dinner is co-organized by Megan Denton, a chef, farmer, and founder of Able Farms in Portland, OR.

goelsewhere.org/farmtotable